Affordable Commercial Santoku

Restaurant Kitchen 7 inch Santoku Knife White Sani Handle New Pro Commercial A+ One of our Best Sellers at The Chef Shops on eBay – Restaurant Kitchen 7 inch Santoku Knife White Sani Handle New Pro Commercial A+ Quality – I have been using my Daily Chef Santoku for over 4 years now and it is still super sharp and super reliable – my go to knife – great economy value for a superior performance every day chef’s knife. Highly recommended – BRAND NEW & RAZOR SHARP – see photos and ask any questions –  NSF Certified –  inexpensive but not cheap!

Santoku blade geometry incorporates the sheep’s foot tip. A sheep’s foot design essentially draws the spine (“backstrap”) down to the front, with very little clearance above the horizontal cutting plane when the blade is resting naturally from heel to forward cutting edge. Providing a more linear cutting edge, the Santoku has limited “rocking” travel (in comparison to a German/Western-style chef’s knife). The Santoku may be used in a rocking motion; however, very little cutting edge makes contact with the surface due to the extreme radius of the tip and very little “tip travel” occurs due to the short cantilever span from contact landing to tip. An example of this limitation can be demonstrated in dicing an onion—a Western knife generally slices downward and then rocks the tip forward to complete a cut; the Santoku relies more on a single downward cut and even landing from heel to tip, thus using less of a rocking motion than Western style cutlery.
The Santoku design is shorter, lighter, thinner, and more hardened (to compensate for thinness) than a traditional Western chef’s knife. Standard Santoku blade length is between 15 and 18 cm (6 and 7 in), in comparison to the typical 20 cm (8 in) home cook’s knife. Most classic kitchen knives maintain a blade angle between 40 and 45 degrees (a bilateral 20 to 22.5 degree shoulder, from cutting edge); Japanese knives typically incorporate a chisel-tip (sharpened on one side), and maintain a more extreme angle (10 to 15 degree shoulder). A classic Santoku will incorporate the Western-style, bilateral cutting edge, but maintain a more extreme 12 to 15 degree shoulder, akin to Japanese cutlery. It is critical to increase the hardness of Santoku steel so edge retention is maintained and “rolling” of the thin cutting edge is mitigated. However, harder, thinner steel is more likely to chip, when pushing against a bone for example. German knives use slightly “softer” steel, but have more material behind their cutting edge. For the average user, a German-style knife is easier to sharpen, but a Santoku knife, if used as designed, will hold its edge longer. With few exceptions, Santoku knives typically have no bolster, sometimes incorporate “scalloped” sides, called kullens, also known as a Granton edge, and maintain a more uniform thickness from spine to blade.

One of our Best Sellers at The Chef Shops on eBay – Restaurant Kitchen 7 inch Santoku Knife White Sani Handle New Pro Commercial A+ Quality – I have been using my Daily Chef Santoku for over 4 years now and it is still super sharp – my go to knife – great economy value for a superior performance every day chef’s knife. Highly recommended – BRAND NEW & RAZOR SHARP – see photos and ask any questions –  NSF  Certified

inexpensive but not cheap! –  affordable santoku chefs knife